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State Department Invests in Program for Circulating Disaster Rumors in Cuba

November-15, 2021 Although Cuba is famous as a country with a successful national liberation movement to its credit and one of the lowest poverty rates in Latin America, the U.S. State Department is initiating a Big Lie campaign to the contrary.  

 

According to the press statement issued by U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken on November 14, the Cuban people are failing to get their most basic economic needs met. With quixotic zeal, he calls for the American people to side with the anarchist wreckers who hope to call the entire issue of Cuban independence into question. In response to recent Western media reports of internet-based populist demands for solutions to supermarket delays in acquiring certain consumer goods, Blinken lept to the conclusion that regime change would be necessary to establish an "end to economic mismanagement."

 

While the circumstances surrounding U.S. imperialism's urge to plunder Cuba are continually changing with the forward march of time, nothing about the aims expressed by Blinken's diatribe in support of regime change is new. The aims of U.S. imperialism's decades of military and financial efforts to weaken and undermine the republic are to restore the country to a state of dependence in the field of its domestic economy as well as to reduce the country to such subservience that it prioritizes so-called "American interests" in all its other affairs of state.

 

The American workers and broad masses of the people are naturally excited about each and every advance made by Cuba on its path of independent development.  It is quite revealing to find the U.S. State Department cherishing even a single ray of hope of turning that reality around. The extreme desperation of the warmakers in Washington is a direct result of the growing class polarization which is manifested in the almost universal hatred of the people for the Democratic and Republican parties and their reactionary and oppressive foreign policy.

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